Comments on: Upcoming updates, upgrades, and maintenance https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/ A blog from the staff at NearlyFreeSpeech.NET. Sun, 01 Apr 2018 01:41:26 +0000 hourly 1 By: jdw https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29185 Thu, 26 Mar 2015 12:40:39 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29185 We were really curious if live-plugging between the two voltages would have worked, but, well, nobody was dying to know. So, after holding that possibility in reserve as punishment for bad behavior for as long as possible, we did that a few days ago. We were able to balance around it after all and minimize disruption. Just a few more updates to go this month! (Mainly MySQL.)

In all seriousness, yes. We love all of our members and their sites, but safety still comes first.

-jdw

]]>
By: Li-aung Yip https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29184 Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:16:09 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29184 > Ordinarily that isn’t an issue that affects our members, but in this case it’s being converted between 120V and 208V. Hypothetically that can be done while the equipment is running, but doing so entails a nonzero risk of death by electrocution and after careful consideration we’ve decided that none of the current field techs are expendable at this time.

As an electrical engineer, I am pleased that your priorities are in correct order. Live work is not justified for the sake of a web hosting service. I would rather a period of degraded service than a crispy electrician.

]]>
By: jdw https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29182 Sun, 08 Mar 2015 20:54:32 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29182 Although I can see why you would think it would, for technical reasons it does not. It is much more scalable and efficient to run the check on the new file server than on the old one, especially while almost everything is still in RAM from being copied.

However if you want to run a similar check on your own from the shell, it is very easy to do. It would look something like:

find -P '/home/public/' -type f -size -1M -exec fgrep -l '/f2/example/' {} \;

Where “example” is replaced with the short name of the site. This will check all reasonably-sized files for anything that looks like an absolute path and list any filenames that might contain one.

-jdw

]]>
By: Daran https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29181 Sun, 08 Mar 2015 20:24:51 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29181 Wouldn’t it make more sense to scan files for hardcoded paths before the upgrade, so as to allow us to preempt these problems?

]]>
By: jdw https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29180 Wed, 04 Mar 2015 03:40:11 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29180 True. -jdw

]]>
By: devicenull https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/2015/03/03/upcoming-updates-upgrades-and-maintenance/#comment-29179 Wed, 04 Mar 2015 01:43:48 +0000 https://blog.nearlyfreespeech.net/?p=545#comment-29179 > Our newer file servers use different technology; they are faster (100% SSD), have no single points of failure, allow hardware maintenance while they are running, and allow us to make major changes (like adding capacity or rebalancing files) behind the scenes without you having to change the configuration of your site.

Octopus based, or proprietary?

]]>